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Articles » Abbeyrose Foundation

  • Looking at Disease a New Way by: Mary Duafala Looking at Disease a New Way by: Mary Duafala

    Posted on by Quantam Health Products

    Looking at Disease a New Way
    by Mary Duafala

    The next time you or your dog get sick, go beyond treating the symptoms (e.g., diarrhea, hot spot, high blood pressure, cancer, Parkinson’s disease) and consider the cause. Instead of classifying an illness as one disease or another that affects one part of the body or another, consider the possibility that the ‘disease’ is actually a symptom of a wider, systemic problem.

    Let’s use cancer as an example. We are learning that our thinking about cancer is flawed. We label two people as having breast cancer, but in reality they may have two entirely different conditions, having different causes and requiring different treatments. Classifying cancer by body site (e.g., breast, colon, prostate, etc.) ignores differences in underlying causes, mechanisms, and pathways involved.

    The conventional approach to treating cancer is to focus on the tumor – to shrink, burn, or cut it out. And then, to wait to see if it comes back. Gene therapy has helped to improve some outcomes, but the results have generally been disappointing.

    A new group of researchers, some from the National Cancer Institute, are beginning to investigate cancer as a systemic (i.e., body as a whole) problem.

    It is well known that cancer cells occur in our body every day, but in most of us, our natural defenses keep them at bay. So, what goes wrong in people (and pets) who develop cancer? Why didn’t their natural defenses snuff out those first cancer cells? Maybe the problem is in the natural defense system and how well it can perform in the body’s biological and energetic terrain. (The body terrain can be likened to the garden soil in which plants grow.) Diet, lifestyle, thoughts, and environmental toxins can all interact with our genes to alter the terrain. Interestingly, the scientific literature offers abundant evidence that diet, exercise, thoughts, feelings, and environmental toxins also influence the initiation, growth, and progression of cancer.

    The immune system and body terrain also have a role in the development of other conditions, suggesting that all disease really boils down to these two things –a weakened immune system and a depleted terrain.  But just as it is challenging to salvage crops from a garden that was ignored too long, waiting until you or your dog is sick to improve the immune system and manage the terrain will make recovery from conditions such as cancer more challenging.

     

     Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
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    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

     

    Looking at Disease a New Way
    by Mary Duafala

    The next time you or your dog get sick, go beyond treating the symptoms (e.g., diarrhea, hot spot, high blood pressure, cancer, Parkinson’s disease) and consider the cause. Instead of classifying an illness as one disease or another that affects one part of the body or another, consider the possibility that the ‘disease’ is actually a symptom of a wider, systemic problem.

    Let’s use cancer as an example. We are learning that our thinking about cancer is flawed. We label two people as having breast cancer, but in reality they may have two entirely different conditions, having different causes and requiring different treatments. Classifying cancer by body site (e.g., breast, colon, prostate, etc.) ignores differences in underlying causes, mechanisms, and pathways involved.

    The conventional approach to treating cancer is to focus on the tumor – to shrink, burn, or cut it out. And then, to wait to see if it comes back. Gene therapy has helped to improve some outcomes, but the results have generally been disappointing.

    A new group of researchers, some from the National Cancer Institute, are beginning to investigate cancer as a systemic (i.e., body as a whole) problem.

    It is well known that cancer cells occur in our body every day, but in most of us, our natural defenses keep them at bay. So, what goes wrong in people (and pets) who develop cancer? Why didn’t their natural defenses snuff out those first cancer cells? Maybe the problem is in the natural defense system and how well it can perform in the body’s biological and energetic terrain. (The body terrain can be likened to the garden soil in which plants grow.) Diet, lifestyle, thoughts, and environmental toxins can all interact with our genes to alter the terrain. Interestingly, the scientific literature offers abundant evidence that diet, exercise, thoughts, feelings, and environmental toxins also influence the initiation, growth, and progression of cancer.

    The immune system and body terrain also have a role in the development of other conditions, suggesting that all disease really boils down to these two things –a weakened immune system and a depleted terrain.  But just as it is challenging to salvage crops from a garden that was ignored too long, waiting until you or your dog is sick to improve the immune system and manage the terrain will make recovery from conditions such as cancer more challenging.

     

     Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
    facebook.com/abbeyrosefoundation
    @abbeyroseARF

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

     

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  • Country of Origin of Processed Food by Mary Duafala Country of Origin of Processed Food by Mary Duafala

    Posted on by Quantam Health Products

    Country of Origin of Processed Food
    by Mary Duafala

    Despite a US Address on the Label, The Country of Origin for Some Ingredients in Your and Your Pet’s Food is Probably China.

    Do you eat NutriGrain bars? Sara Lee bread? Do you feed your dog or cat dry or canned food? While the label shows an address in the US, did you know these products contain ingredients sourced from many other countries, including China and India?

    In many cases, ingredients sourced from outside the US are used in the final manufacturing of processed food. This last step is done in the US and the food labeled as made in the US, with no reference to the fact that some of the ingredients were obtained from outside the US. This is a problem because the quality of ingredients sourced from some countries is in question. Failure of processed food labels to divulge the source (also called the country of origin) of raw materials is a big issue in the pet and human processed food industries.

    A lawsuit was filed on January 7, 2016 against some pet food manufacturers for allegedly mislabeling products as made in the US when ingredients were actually sourced elsewhere. A University of Texas study showed similar issues with processed food made for human consumption.

    If you or your pet eat processed foods, beware!

    Merrick and Nestle Purina sued over mislabeling Pet Food: In a $5 million class action lawsuit, Merrick Pet Care (doing business as Castor and Pollux Natural Petworks LLC; Pet Appeal One LLC, also known as Castor and Pollux Natural Petworks LLC); Nestle USA; Nestle Purina Petcare; and Does 1-10 are being sued over claims they falsely labeled certain dog and cat foods as being made in the US. (Does 1-10 is a placeholder name used in legal actions for people whose true identity is unknown or must be withheld for legal reasons.) These products allegedly contained vitamin, mineral and amino acid mixes some of whose ingredients were sourced from outside the US. (Western Division of the Northern District of California Case number 2.16-CV-00139-FMO-AS.)

    University of Texas Food Studies Project reports the potential source of ingredients for NutriGrain bars and Sara Lee bread: The study found that NutriGrain bars contain ingredients sourced in the US, China (vitamins and minerals), Philippines (Carrageenan), India (guar gum), Europe, Denmark, Italy, and Scotland. A loaf of Sara Lee bread lists an address in Illinois, but the ingredients are sourced from the US, China, Vietnam, India, Australia, Russia, various non-US North and South American countries, Switzerland, Netherlands, and Other European Countries.

     

    Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
    facebook.com/abbeyrosefoundation
    @abbeyroseARF

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

     

    Country of Origin of Processed Food
    by Mary Duafala

    Despite a US Address on the Label, The Country of Origin for Some Ingredients in Your and Your Pet’s Food is Probably China.

    Do you eat NutriGrain bars? Sara Lee bread? Do you feed your dog or cat dry or canned food? While the label shows an address in the US, did you know these products contain ingredients sourced from many other countries, including China and India?

    In many cases, ingredients sourced from outside the US are used in the final manufacturing of processed food. This last step is done in the US and the food labeled as made in the US, with no reference to the fact that some of the ingredients were obtained from outside the US. This is a problem because the quality of ingredients sourced from some countries is in question. Failure of processed food labels to divulge the source (also called the country of origin) of raw materials is a big issue in the pet and human processed food industries.

    A lawsuit was filed on January 7, 2016 against some pet food manufacturers for allegedly mislabeling products as made in the US when ingredients were actually sourced elsewhere. A University of Texas study showed similar issues with processed food made for human consumption.

    If you or your pet eat processed foods, beware!

    Merrick and Nestle Purina sued over mislabeling Pet Food: In a $5 million class action lawsuit, Merrick Pet Care (doing business as Castor and Pollux Natural Petworks LLC; Pet Appeal One LLC, also known as Castor and Pollux Natural Petworks LLC); Nestle USA; Nestle Purina Petcare; and Does 1-10 are being sued over claims they falsely labeled certain dog and cat foods as being made in the US. (Does 1-10 is a placeholder name used in legal actions for people whose true identity is unknown or must be withheld for legal reasons.) These products allegedly contained vitamin, mineral and amino acid mixes some of whose ingredients were sourced from outside the US. (Western Division of the Northern District of California Case number 2.16-CV-00139-FMO-AS.)

    University of Texas Food Studies Project reports the potential source of ingredients for NutriGrain bars and Sara Lee bread: The study found that NutriGrain bars contain ingredients sourced in the US, China (vitamins and minerals), Philippines (Carrageenan), India (guar gum), Europe, Denmark, Italy, and Scotland. A loaf of Sara Lee bread lists an address in Illinois, but the ingredients are sourced from the US, China, Vietnam, India, Australia, Russia, various non-US North and South American countries, Switzerland, Netherlands, and Other European Countries.

     

    Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
    facebook.com/abbeyrosefoundation
    @abbeyroseARF

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

     

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  • A Super Food You Can Make at Home for You and Your Pet: Bone Broth, by Mary Duafala A Super Food You Can Make at Home for You and Your Pet: Bone Broth, by Mary Duafala

    Posted on by Ben Schmidt

    A Super Food You Can Make at Home for You and Your Pet – Bone Broth
    by Mary Duafala

    Bone broth is an inexpensive source of minerals (e.g., calcium, silicon, sulphur, magnesium, phosphorus, trace minerals) in an easily absorbable form along with other nutrients you and your dog will love.  Often, a sick dog will drink bone broth when he will not eat anything else.  But a healthy, vital, energetic dog can also benefit from bone broth.  

    Bone broth contains the broken-down material from cartilage and tendons (e.g., chondroitin, sulphates, glucosamine) and is good for the joints.  It also helps to detoxify the liver and promotes a healthy gut.  When broth is cooled, it congeals due to the presence of gelatin, which is reportedly good for a long list of ailments.

    Making bone broth is easy.  You can begin with bones, some pieces of meat and fat, and vegetable.  Before adding to the other ingredients, the bones can be browned in a hot oven (optional) to form compounds that enhance the flavor and color.  Then add bones (e.g., chicken feet, beef marrow bones, lamb bones), garlic (optional), vegetables (optional) to a pot.  Cover with cold water, add vinegar (to help extract the calcium) and heat the broth slowly on the stove-top or using a crockpot.  Allow the broth to simmer for about 2 hours for fish broth, all day for chicken, turkey, or duck broth, and 24 hours for beef broth.  Strain out the bones and refrigerate, then skim off the fat that has congealed on top.  The broth that remains will look like jelly.  The broth can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days or frozen.  Add the bone broth to your dog’s regular meal in teaspoon or tablespoon amounts, depending on their size.  More broth can be fed to a sick dog.

    Bone broth is also good for humans.  Broth is considered a cure-all in traditional households and is commonly made from chicken, fish, beef, or lamb.  It is said that bone broth “builds strong bones, assuages sore throats, nurtures the sick, puts vigor in the step, and sparkle in love life….for chefs, it is the magic elixir for making soul-warming soups and matchless sauces.”

    For more information on the benefits of bone broth and details on how to make it, go to http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/how-to-make-bone-broth-for-your-dog/ or to http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/broth-is-beautiful/.

     

    Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
    facebook.com/abbeyrosefoundation
    @abbeyroseARF

     

     

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

    A Super Food You Can Make at Home for You and Your Pet – Bone Broth
    by Mary Duafala

    Bone broth is an inexpensive source of minerals (e.g., calcium, silicon, sulphur, magnesium, phosphorus, trace minerals) in an easily absorbable form along with other nutrients you and your dog will love.  Often, a sick dog will drink bone broth when he will not eat anything else.  But a healthy, vital, energetic dog can also benefit from bone broth.  

    Bone broth contains the broken-down material from cartilage and tendons (e.g., chondroitin, sulphates, glucosamine) and is good for the joints.  It also helps to detoxify the liver and promotes a healthy gut.  When broth is cooled, it congeals due to the presence of gelatin, which is reportedly good for a long list of ailments.

    Making bone broth is easy.  You can begin with bones, some pieces of meat and fat, and vegetable.  Before adding to the other ingredients, the bones can be browned in a hot oven (optional) to form compounds that enhance the flavor and color.  Then add bones (e.g., chicken feet, beef marrow bones, lamb bones), garlic (optional), vegetables (optional) to a pot.  Cover with cold water, add vinegar (to help extract the calcium) and heat the broth slowly on the stove-top or using a crockpot.  Allow the broth to simmer for about 2 hours for fish broth, all day for chicken, turkey, or duck broth, and 24 hours for beef broth.  Strain out the bones and refrigerate, then skim off the fat that has congealed on top.  The broth that remains will look like jelly.  The broth can be stored in the refrigerator for a few days or frozen.  Add the bone broth to your dog’s regular meal in teaspoon or tablespoon amounts, depending on their size.  More broth can be fed to a sick dog.

    Bone broth is also good for humans.  Broth is considered a cure-all in traditional households and is commonly made from chicken, fish, beef, or lamb.  It is said that bone broth “builds strong bones, assuages sore throats, nurtures the sick, puts vigor in the step, and sparkle in love life….for chefs, it is the magic elixir for making soul-warming soups and matchless sauces.”

    For more information on the benefits of bone broth and details on how to make it, go to http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/how-to-make-bone-broth-for-your-dog/ or to http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/broth-is-beautiful/.

     

    Join the arf Community!
    www.abbeyrosefoundation.org
    info@abbeyrosefoundation.org
    facebook.com/abbeyrosefoundation
    @abbeyroseARF

     

     

    Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of the Abbeyrose Foundation or its staff.

    © Abbeyrose Foundation. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of the Abbeyrose Foundation. Want to learn more from the Abbeyrose Foundation? Sign up for the newsletter here www.abbeyrosefoundation.org.

    Read more